Happy fall, folks! If you are the author of one of the 228 manuscripts we received between February and May for our annual chapbook contests, you may have been patiently (or perhaps less-than-patiently) waiting for results to be announced, since we estimated results to be ready by the end of September. This post is, sadly, not that announcement. However, we are getting very close and approaching a finalists list for each of the two categories. So, while I hesitate to give a specific date, we should have decisions announced soon. I know that it can be nerve-wracking to not hear about the status of a submission for so long — especially a manuscript — and so I wanted to offer this brief note as reassurance that the news shouldn’t be much longer, and that we are only a few weeks behind and really looking forward to getting the winning works published.

In the meantime, enjoy some recent accomplishments from some of our past contributors:

  • Meg Cowen (PN 11), Co-Editor and Co-founder of Pith and Kin Press, recently released this anthology of selections from the first year of the journal’s online issues. Also includes work from Nancy Chen Long (PN 11) (and yours truly). You can find it here.
  • Stephanie McCarley Dugger — who was a 2014 Vella Co-Winner — has her first full-length poetry collection available for pre-order here.
  • Charles Rafferty — a 2015 Vella Co-Winner — has had two poems in The Writer’s Almanac recently. You can find them here and here.

Thanks for your patience, and keep an eye out for some big announcements here soon.

Advertisements

We are overjoyed to release our final chapbook from our 2016 contest, a Debut Series Co-Winner: Jessica Kim’s “These, Our Bodies.” These poems are at once luminous, hard-wrought, and tender. Jessica is also a talented in visual work, and is the cover’s photographer and graphic designer, making this a truly gorgeous book, inside and out.

You can order a copy here directly, or also look around our Books section, to see if any of our other great titles catch your eye.

You can also see more at our fledgling Instagram, @paper.nautilus (which, for this 30-something millennial, is more intuitive than Twitter), where we share a few more insights to our bookmaking process, day-to-day tasks of being an editor, and shout-outs to former contributors and editors doing great things.

Now that all five of our new titles this year have been published and released, I’ve turned my attention more towards reading the 2017 chapbook entries. While I still have quite a ways to go on the 228 entries we received across categories, I can already tell there are going to be some very difficult decisions. Stay tuned, and hopefully we’ll have some exciting news to share about the results by sometime this September!

I have been opening the Vella and Debut Series Chapbook Contests on February 15th for the past several years — which also happens to be my birthday. But this year, I just did have a chance to prepare in time, and that deadline came quietly. So it made me really happy that a few writers contacted Paper Nautilus and asked if we’d be accepting manuscripts this year. It felt like this pattern had become something people looked forward to, and that was a nice reminder of how much I enjoy doing this work.

Submissions opened yesterday, February 17, and will be open until May 31. You can submitt — or find all the details you’ll need on each of the contest categories — here.

Sadly, the annual issues of Paper Nautilus are on a hiatus. That doesn’t mean they’re permanently discontinued, but it does mean that we’re unable to juggle that project right now. My amazing staff who have been reading and voting on the submissions for the annual issues, have largely moved on to other stages of their lives where they can’t contribute as much anymore. It seems like the obvious solution to that is simply find more staff to serve as editors; my life has also shifted in a way where I don’t have as much time to devote to Paper Nautilus. I enjoy the work of the chapbooks so much more, and I also believe it has a more significant impact for the writer than publishing an individual work, which guided this decision. As I’ve noted in previous posts, it may also be time to reassess the publishing landscape, and figure out if a print periodical is the best way to support a writer’s work. So, more on this sometime, when I myself know more.

In the meantime, please tell the writers in your life to send their 16-24 page manuscripts of any and all literary genres our way!